3.45" Rosasite, Malachite, and Selenite on Ferroan Dolomite - Morocco

This colorful specimen contains spots of tealish rosasite and deep green fibrous malachite crystals on a bed of dark purplish ferroan dolomite. The whole specimen is coated with a thin layer of clear, sparkling selenite crystals. The cluster of rosasite along one edge of the specimen is composed of tiny botryoidal spheres!

This specimen comes with an acrylic display stand.

Malachite is an intense green copper-based mineral that can be found in a wide variety of forms. Malachite can grow in botryoidal masses, stalactitic formations, and reniform formations, typically as a tight cluster of fanning fibrous needles that make up a seemingly solid mass. As layers continue to stack during formation, banded patterns can sometimes begin to take shape, explaining the rings in all shades of green seen on most polished malachite specimens.

Malachite results from the weathering of other copper ores, and is very often found associated with other copper-based minerals such as azurite and chrysocolla. It can be found in copper deposits around the world, but the Democratic Republic of the Congo is the primary source for polished malachite and mineral specimens.

Malachite has been prized since ancient times, first as a utilitarian copper ore, then as an ornamental stone. Due to its value as a decorative stone, it is rarely mined as a copper ore anymore.

Rosasite is a secondary mineral that forms in oxidation zones of copper-zinc deposits, generally forming a fibrous botryoidal sphere that can appear vitreous and silky. While typically featuring a blue-green color, colorless specimens are not unheard of. The chemical formula of rosasite is CuZnCO3(OH)2.

Dolomite is an anhydrous carbonate mineral composed of calcium magnesium carbonate (CaMg(CO3)2).

The mineral dolomite crystallizes in the trigonal-rhombohedral system. It forms white, tan, gray, or pink crystals. Dolomite is a double carbonate, having an alternating structural arrangement of calcium and magnesium ions. It does not rapidly dissolve in dilute hydrochloric acid as calcite does. Crystal twinning is common.

Dolomite was first described by Carl Linnaeus in 1768, and in 1791 it was described as a rock by the French naturalist and geologist Déodat Gratet de Dolomieu. He first recognized the material in buildings of the old city of Rome, and later as samples collected in the mountains known as the Dolomite Alps of northern Italy.

FOR SALE
$19
DETAILS
SPECIES
Rosasite, Malachite, Gypsum var. Selenite & Dolomite
LOCATION
Bou Bekker, Touissit, Morocco
SIZE
3.45 x 2.45"
CATEGORY
ITEM
#290827